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Beyond 9/11 photographed by Marco Grob wins Emmy

Marco Grob (born in Olten Switzerland, 10' from where I grew up) has won an Emmy together with TIME for the stunning portraits of "Beyond 9/11 Portraits of Resilience" in the category "New Approaches to News and Documentary Programming"

The The 9/11: Portraits of Resilience project also appeared as a special issue, a film documentary, a book and a photo exhibition. But the website is “perhaps the purest expression of what we attempted to accomplish,” said TIME Managing Editor Rick Stengel. “It’s very gratifying that it was recognized and I want to first of all pay tribute to the brave men and women who suffered through the terrible events of 9/11 and then shared their stories with us and the world.”

(via TIME)

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5 Things Every Presenter Should Know About People, Animated

This video already shows how one should present. It might be more work to think of visuals to be put on slides but worth the effort as people consume better what you say / the message is clearer. Just watch this video by Dr. Susan Weinshenk. I wish I could draw as awesome though.. [vimeo http://vimeo.com/44267609]

  1. People learn best in 20-minute chunks. There must be a reason for the successful TED-sized talk format.
  2. Multiple sensory channels compete. During a talk, you engage both the auditory and visual channels — because we’re visual creatures and the visual channel trumps the auditory, make sure your slides don’t require people to read much or otherwise distract from the talk.
  3. What you say is only one part of your presentation. Paralinguistics explores how information is communicated beyond words — be aware the audience is responding to your body language and tone. Record yourself presenting to get a feel for those and adjust accordingly.
  4. If you want people to act, you have to call them to action. At the end of your presentation, be very specific about exactly what you would like your audience to do.
  5. People imitate your emotions and feel your feelings. If you’re passionate about your topic, this excitement will be contagious for the audience. Don’t hold back.

(via brainpickings.org)

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9 things Lady Gaga can teach us about community management

This week, Lady Gaga became the first person to exceed 20m followers on Twitter.

These are huge numbers, but volume rarely means anything on its own. The interesting point here is that this community really are her 'followers' - in namesake and in the way they respond to her.

They are more loyal than a brand could ever dream of, but there are some lessons that we can all take on board and implement when trying to build a community either online or off.

  1. Look at existing behavior and run with it One of the biggest mistakes brands make when entering into the world of social media is a lack of response. Whether we’re talking about social customer service, or just engaging with people who love your brand;  it’s very hard to do either well without there being some kind of interaction.
  2. Invest and incentives Not only has she personally invested in Backplane, a technology-based community platform, but she also uses Fancorps – another platform from which she leverages a street team of over 25,000. Fancorps incentivises people to share the word of Gaga both online and offline, people are rewarded with points to be used against tracks or albums, tickets, collateral, virtual gifts and more.
  3. Show your flaws Instead of taking this popularity, and shying away from it, keeping things behind closed doors – she’s embraced it and flung open the doors. There are messages from her bedroom, videos shot backstage, interviews where she’ll open up about being scared about performing. The whole shebang.  
  4. She's true to her brand It might be ever-changing, chameleon style, but Gaga’s brand knows itself like no other. It know its stance on equality, sexuality, friendship and more. These might not be issues that every brand needs to consider, but working out what your social voice is.  
  5. Change Keeping people engaged for longer periods of time means exciting them. Sadly, attention spans are much shorter than they used to be, and so there’s a need to create a richer content plan now more than ever.
  6. Authenticity There are no holds barred with Gaga. What you see is what you get, she’s the one doing the talking.  You can tell this by the candid images and videos, to the way she talks online. She’s the one running the show.
  7. Targeting like-minded people To properly build a community, a scattergun approach will not work. There are too many forums, networks, games and apps for people to get involved with, and suck up their time.For years, the benefits of mass-niche communities have been shouted from the rooftops, but now, this is tipped to be the 'future' of networked society. 
  8. Gratitude Without a doubt, the power of Gaga is her fans. Her crazy, loyal, would-do-anything-to-support-her fans. She knows that, and she tells them regularly. It’s the most simple aspect of her community management, it’s free and it takes no time at all.
  9. Collaboration Co-creation and collaboration is the name of the game at the moment. Well, it has been for a while really, but it’s matured enough to be of real use to a brand. Nokia’s just announced that it will centre a large of its international marketing strategy around this, just to show you how it’s evolved as a concept.

See the full article on econsultancy.com

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100 years of Swiss graphic design

This expo offers more than just the Helvetica font and is definitely worth a visit if you are in Zurich. - still runs until 3 June 2012.

Swiss graphic design – one of the country’s leading products – is encountered everywhere. While a single individual style cannot be identified, a certain common approach is evident. This is revealed in the striking awareness of quality in the works, in the skilled handcraft, as well as in the precision and reduction to essentials. Graphic design from Switzerland reflects both international trends and local qualities; irony and wit are its constant companions. The view of one hundred years of graphic design shows both the diversity of current visual communication as well as the fine lines of tradition that connect works from different epochs. Alongside the poster and smaller items of printed matter, the show also includes outstanding examples from advertising and information graphics, typography, signage or book design, design objects that relate to graphic design, as well as selected striking advertising spots, and works for web design. Many objects come from the museum’s own collection.

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America's incredible mobile year 2011 or the clamor for more spectrum

The US isn't the largest developing and consuming country when it comes to wireless technologies you would have said in the last few years compared to Europe or Asia, especially Japan or India. This has changed looking at the figures of 2011 (from mobilefuture.org): 8.8 trillion texts were sent which presents 15% more than the year before, the data traffic soar by 1800% in the past four years (!), 166% increase of Facebook Mobile users in the first half of 2011 only, 103m wireless tweets posted each day, more smartphones were bought than PC. Short video with more facts about the year: [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKAIzU90zA8]

In fact, the market with its smartphones and user behavior is pretty hungry but the mobile network is currently running out of airwaves (know as spectrum crunch). On 14 February 2012 America's Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rejected the possibility to increase the capacity consistent of the proposal by LightSquared to use airwaves formerly used by satellite operators. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) stated that LightSquared technology would interfere with navigation equipement used by planes and operators (see recommendation).

(via cnnmoney)

Heads of AT&T and the FCC are currently discussiung new and different approaches to the spectrum crunch at this years Mobile World Congress currently running in Barcelona, reports pcmag.com: 

Not surprisingly, Ralph de la Vega, president and CEO of AT&T Mobility, pushed for a more market-based approach to spectrum allocation here at Mobile World Congress, while FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski expressed concern that a recent spectrum auction deal in Congress might decrease the agency's power on the issue.

One spectrum crunch option that recently made its way through Congress is voluntary spectrum auctions, with broadcasters selling unused, excess spectrum to carriers. The FCC would oversee the auctions, providing some of the proceeds to the participating broadcasters and the rest to the U.S. Treasury.

Earlier this month, AT&T argued that the FCC should not be allowed to impose restrictions on the auctions - namely, the commission should not be able to limit how much spectrum the larger, more wealthier carriers could snap up.

One of the concerns about not having FCC oversight of auctions is that the biggest carriers like AT&T and Verizon will buy everything, leaving nothing for the smaller providers. To that end, T-Mobile and several consumer groups recently asked the FCC to stop Verizon from purchasing $3.6 billion worth of spectrum from the nation's top cable providers.

Verizon defended the purchase in a recent blog post.

"Rather than waste time arguing about spectrum efficiency, let's focus on the issue on which we all agree: America's wireless consumers face a spectrum crunch that won't be relieved by Verizon's spectrum purchase," wrote Charla Wrath, vice president of Verizon policy development. "It's up to the industry, as well as policymakers, to help ensure that more spectrum reaches the marketplace soon, so America's wireless industry remains the global leader in innovation that it is today. I'm sure T-Mobile would agree with that."

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Do more of what makes you happy

Sounds easy, but often we let ourselves get distracted by other things which we think is better or more prestigious, by what we should do or by what we think brings in more money. This applies to companies or business cases too. However, I am personally convinced that if you do what you love and where your passion lies in, without listen to other people around you, then everything else follows: prestige if you want, money, success, happiness, self-fullfillment.. As for companies, I believe if the basic customer need is fullfilled and how the customer wants it, then everything else follows too (success, money, brand value, sustainable relationships..) - just look at the iPhone and the time before the iPhone in terms of accessing the internet. Maria Popova from Brain Pickings put together a great list of seven thinkers on these ideas - here a snapshot of the full article:

  1. PAUL GRAHAM ON HOW TO DO WHAT YOU LOVE "Prestige is like a powerful magnet that warps even your beliefs about what you enjoy. It causes you to work not on what you like, but what you’d like to like. If you do anything well enough, you’ll make it prestigious."
  2. AlAIN DE BUTTON ON SUCCESS "One of the interesting things about success is that we think we know what it means. A lot of the time our ideas about what it would mean to live successfully are not our own. We should focus in on our ideas and make sure that we own them, that we’re truly the authors of our own ambitions. Because it’s bad enough not getting what you want, but it’s even worse to have an idea of what it is you want and find out at the end of the journey that it isn’t, in fact, what you wanted all along."
  3. HUGH MACLEAOD ON SETTING BOUNDARIES "28. The best way to get approval is not to need it. This is equally true in art and business. And love. And sex. And just about everything else worth having."
  4. LEWIS HYDE ON WORK VS LABOR "Work is an intended activity that is accomplished through the will. Writing a poem, raising a child, developing a new calculus, resolving a neurosis, invention in all forms — these are labors. There is no technology, no time-saving device that can alter the rhythms of creative labor. When the worth of labor is expressed in terms of exchange value, therefore, creativity is automatically devalued every time there is an advance in the technology of work."
  5. STEVE JOBS ON NOT SETTLING "Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle." [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF8uR6Z6KLc] 
  6. ROBERT KRULWHICH ON FRIENDS "If you can… fall in love, with the work, with people you work with, with your dreams and their dreams. Whatever it was that got you to this school, don’t let it go. Whatever kept you here, don’t let that go. Believe in your friends. Believe that what you and your friends have to say… that the way you’re saying it — is something new in the world."
  7. THE HOLSTEE MANIFESTO

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Brands get physical to build trust

This piece goes along with what we learn in marketing classes that a person is more likely to buy a product/convinced of a product when he can touch it rather then just smell or even only see it on a picture. However, the sensory experience can yet be a bigger differentiator as we become substantially more digital. Further, customer's touch points with a brand are opportunities to make a trustworthy relationship. Fast Company has an interesting article on this:

From handshakes to hardware, intimate signals constantly affect us in life. As the world becomes increasingly digital, we are losing many sensory signals that once moved us. Here's what can companies do to reclaim these touching moments. [...] We’ve come to depend on a whole new set of tones as we key in numbers on an ATM or a cell phone. [...] we need to find a way to compensate for the absence of touch.

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Marlboro car projection mapping (Audi)

  [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=837NcHMtlvU]

10.12.11, Moscow Client: Marlboro Agency: ATOMIC Advertising Agency Presentation of a new car branding Car projection by Radugadesign: motion: Anton Novosad, Yuriy Izmailov, Weaponer sound: Ibenji art-direction: Ivan Nefedkin stage design: Mikhail Egoshin technical direction: Alexander Polonskiy

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teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea

Classic but still as valid as ever before and exactly how one needs to motivate a team. "If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea." Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

"Quand tu veux construire un bateau, ne commence pas par rassembler du bois, couper des planches et distribuer du travail, mais reveille au sein des hommes le desir de la mer grande et large." Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

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Pinterest: a quick overview

As you might have realized another ubiquitous thing on Facebook going on at the moment is Pinterest. I remember it popping up a year ago but didn't quite see the use of it beside Facebook. But people, especially women, going crazy at the moment - here a quick overview with an infographic done by lemon.ly. The numbers show a clear influence in (viral) marketing and an audience to look after now and in the future. (click to enlarge)

(via mashable.com)

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The happy secret to better work

While browsing through the TED talks I stumbled upon this video. First I thought I do not want to see another "how-to-be-happy" instructions but finally gave it a try after reading the intro. And it was totally worth it and thus the reason I want to share it. Not only because Shawn Achor's speech is hilarious and he could easily work as stand-up comedian, but most importantly because he uses a different viewing angle to look at happiness. Watch and think about it![ted id=1344]

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the social enterprise: google to join salesforce.com on stage

The new details of the dreamforce 11 conference in San Francisco sound exciting!Dreamforce 2011 will be held Aug. 30 - Sept. 2 at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco.

As we enter the post-PC revolution, companies are improving the way they collaborate, communicate and share information with customers and employees in the cloud - transforming themselves into social enterprises. Social enterprises build social profiles of customers, create internal social networks and listen to and engage with customers over the Internet. Dreamforce offers the content and educational opportunities that will enable attendees to transform their companies into social enterprises.

(via marketwatch)

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Murdoch's News Corp. intensify the activities in online learning

Interesting dossier on online learning by GOOD.is

GothamSchools reported earlier today that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. announced it was acquiring a Brooklyn-based startup that specializes in education technology called Wireless Generation. It's the second Brooklyn-born entity with a penchant for using technology to individualize education that Murdoch's acquired this month.

The other was New York City Schools Chancellor Joel Klein, who announced his resignation two weeks ago. Klein joined News Corp. as an executive vice president in charge of looking into opportunities in the digital learning space, part of what Murdoch refers to as the $500 billion K-12 education sector. Over the years, Klein has talked about the promise of digital learning—from online learning to so-called "blended learning" situations, where students learn from a mix of both computer-based and live instruction.

Read more on GOOD.is

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